Problem Definition

Our project this semester for our firm is designing a mid-level school in a very strategic location in Cebeci. In order to tackle this problem, we did a quick research about how the information regarding this problem occurred. There are three main aspects of approaching the situation. Seeing this design as an educational institution, seeing it as an urban-scaled project and focusing on it being on Cebeci. to tackle this, we produced and tried to define our problem:

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Designing Using Sketching and CAD

After designed the plan of the Housing Reference Project, I recognized the true practicality of using the media of real life sketching. By printing the digital plan and then studying different solutions, i am able to design more affectively. After this there is always the solution to bring your abstract decisions to work on the properly drawn digital media.

Triangulation vs Curvalinear vs Ortogonally Linear

For the first initial process of my design project in the Arch201, I wanted to explore different languages of design. Because of the reason the reason that in our first studio I choose to study with a purely orthogonal design, I wanted to challenge myself to see the different possibilities and potentials that come with different tools. Firstly I studied with the addition of some paths that move around and create separations and spaces with the usage of red-taped lines. Then I saw that the creation of spaces can also be constructed in a more volumetric manner. I used triangulation to obtain a folding surface and has more orientation.

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After that, I saw that I can also produce a spatial experience by using organic curvilinear elements. These curved surfaces were constructed by the strategy of a transition that comes from being at zero level to some value in a smooth manner. This creates an increasing enclosure level that I got inspired very much that to inject that triangulation tool to that strategy of producing volumes.

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Taşkale & Meke Maar

History of Architecture: 1500-750 BCE

This week we are examining the architectural history between 1500-750 BCE that brings us the Cretan people who are a peace-loving society, merged and has lack of fortification. In their cities, they don’t have much of a hierarchical dispute, therefore, their indirect circulation throughout the city results in the labyrinth-like organizations that function as an interrelated physical web, unlike any societal dwellings.These people have a large sympathy for the natural landscape of that area which protects them from outsiders and exemplifies an understanding of an integration into the land. They only have Fortified towers that protect the whole civilization which suggests some kind of organizing factors that gets rid of inland disputes. In their communities, there is a tight mesh of narrow streets that connect together in a complex urban textured manner. With this much densely packed area there’s also a technology that enables them to introduce an indoor plumbing system which is very sophisticated for its nature. Minoan Crete’s another distinct quality is the ceiling windows which was also unheard of.

Throughout centuries these monumental structures made by Minoans got destroyed several times caused by natural disasters despite that the fact that they perished the nature and its potential. After the eruption of a volcano, the city got very weakened and shortly after, got taken over by the Mycenaeans. They had a very militaristic approach to their society and their architects designed lithic, solid and hierarchical structures stemming from this approach which was very different from the nonhierarchical Minoans. Their houses lacked big openings and relationships with nature. A shift from pleasure towards dread occurred. This situation lasted for some time and also shifted towards the Hittites in now Turkey.

Now we move on to Ancient Egypt where the pyramids limited the spatial discoveries and complexities to develop for centuries. With the change of power with notably Hatshepsut, she transformed architecture into a new spatial organization that function to bolster her rule. With the emergence of advanced technologies, new temples and residential developments also transformed. Sequences from open spaces to closed spaces became evident in the use of gigantic columns and colossal statues. After the queen’s rule, with the rule of Akhenaten temples and buildings gained more light with the new idea of the sun religion-related with Ra. Consequently, Pharaohs that followed them became obsessed with their afterlife image and became god-like symbols. Their paintings and their monumental statues saturated the cities. In these times, the religion became more involved with the public and temples began to be located on both sides of the rivers and be connected by a “fastigium” that passes through a general axis that relates itself to the temples and the city.